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Dear Readers

The Slovak Spectator has always taken care to earn the readers' trust, especially when it comes to the paper's credibility and political independence.

Dear Readers,


The Slovak Spectator has always taken care to earn the readers' trust, especially when it comes to the paper's credibility and political independence.

We know that our readers expect the same quality from us that they do from well established Western publications. We take it as a matter of pride to resolve the challenges and economic pressures presented by the Slovak media market without violating the professional standards of independent journalism.

Our readers also know that we treat advertising as something strictly separate from editorial content, and this is how we will proceed in the future.

This season, we decided to renew a popular series that The Slovak Spectator first introduced in 2000: a Q&A with prominent CEOs within the foreign investment community designed to give insight into Slovakia's investment environment, its challenges, and the remarkable development that has turned the country into one of the most attractive investment destinations in the region.

Then as now, the series will be supported through advertising. Then as now, the editorial content will adhere to professional journalistic standards. Advertisers who also happen to be the subject of our interviews do not pre-approve questions or censor content.

As the sole English-language print news source in Slovakia, the Spectator knows that it is under the close watch of the most demanding group of readers: business people, diplomats, top executives, academics, politicians, students and colleagues. We hope to continue to live up to your expectations.


Beata Balogová,
editor-in-chief

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