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SEPTEMBER

Polls, stats, trends

ACCORDING to a regular poll carried out by Trend weekly, one half of 112 selected top managers in Slovakia consider early elections a bad idea.

Top managers split on early elections


ACCORDING to a regular poll carried out by Trend weekly, one half of 112 selected top managers in Slovakia consider early elections a bad idea.

The poll, which was carried out in the second half of September, also showed that 31.2 percent of business leaders are in favour of early elections.

Almost 11 percent of the respondents were neutral on the issue.


Czech best foreign language for Slovaks


A EUROBAROMETER poll, published on September 23 by the European Commission, showed that according to Slovak respondents the best foreign language they speak is Czech.

Of all Slovak respondents, 31 percent said they spoke Czech the best, followed by German with 28 percent, and Russian, with 25 percent, the TASR news agency reported.

In the Czech Republic, the first foreign language spoken is German, with 31 percent of people saying they spoke the language. Next was English with 24 percent and Russian with 19 percent.

The Eurobarometer showed that one half of Europeans speak at least one foreign language. In Slovakia it is as much as 69 percent.

The most commonly spoken foreign language is English with one third of all EU citizens speaking it. German was the second most commonly spoken language, with 12 percent, followed by French with 11 percent.


Slovak pupils lack books at home


ACCORDING to a report on youth, just 12 percent of Slovakia's eighth graders have more than 200 books at home, the TASR news agency wrote.

Slovakia therefore lags behind the EU average, where 20 percent of pupils have more than 200 books at home.

The report also says there is a correlation between the number of books a pupil has at home and school performance. According to the report this was proven by an international survey carried out on 14-year-old respondents who were asked math and natural science questions. Pupils with many books scored 551 points on average, 127 points more than the performance of Slovakia's 14-year-olds who said they had only around 10 books at home.


Czechs put in more hours than Slovaks


SLOVAKS work fewer hours than their Czech neighbours, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

The OECD found that an average Slovak worked 1,735 hours last year, which was 251 hours less than the average Czech, the daily SME reported.

Economists were not sure for the reasons behind the relatively low number of hours the average Slovak works. Some think, however, that it is because of Slovakia's flexible Labour Code, which gives firms a free hand to employ people on part-time contracts.


PCs more common in households with children


ACCORDING to a finding on information and communication technologies carried out by the Slovak Statistics Office, 38.5 percent of Slovak households have a computer and 23.3 percent have access to the Internet.

However, in households where at least one member is under 16 years old, computers are more common.

As many as 49.6 percent of these households have a computer, the SITA news agency reported.

The finding also showed that 90.2 percent of Slovak households have a TV set and 74.2 percent have a mobile phone.

Only 9.9 percent of Slovaks aged between 16 and 74 bought something via the Internet in the last 12 months.


Many Bratislava hotels lack good Internet connection


Approximately one-third of the two dozen two, three and four-star hotels in Slovakia's capital city of Bratislava can offer guests a satisfactory Internet connection, a poll carried out by Kapsch Telecom found, the TASR news agency reported.

Two thirds of the hotels either cannot offer guests an Internet connection or only offer a slow dial-up connection or wireless WiFi.

Higher standard hotels offer an Internet connection in their business centres and in hotel rooms, with guests having access to the World Wide Web through broadband connections.


Slovaks lack money to go on holiday


IN the second quarter of 2005 only 18.7 percent of Slovaks went for a holiday that lasted more than five days, and 8.7 percent of Slovaks took a shorter holiday than that, a poll carried out by the Slovak Statistical Office showed.

During this period, 72.6 percent of Slovaks did not go for a holiday at all, which was a 3.1 percent decrease year-on-year, the TASR news agency wrote.

Among the main reasons for not going on holiday was a lack of money, with 29.5 percent identifying this as the main cause. Some 26.7 percent said they planned to go on holiday at a different time of the year.

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