Reader feedback: Significant improvements achieved

Re: Reforms praised but needy grow poorer, new report says, By Beata Balogová, October 17 - 23, 2005

I totally agree with the recent living standards assessment report published by the World Bank that praised Slovakia for the structural reforms implemented after the 2002 general elections, which sharply increased the country's economic competitiveness.

Having been part of an evaluation team that visited countries under Communism, including several to the former Czechoslovakia, I can attest to the fact that very significant improvements have been achieved. I have also been back to Slovakia on many, many, occasions since its independence.

The sociologist from the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Zusana Kusá, contends that the report is a "recycling" of the opinions of others.

To criticize the positive assessment exposes the dearth of her knowledge of the subject.

And she ought to know that it is common practice to issue a disclaimer in ALL reports submitted to an organization such as the World Bank. Does that make the report biased?

Also, to suggest that the primary goal of the reform is not to improve the lives of the average citizen shows her own personal agenda, very biased indeed.

Constructive criticism is helpful but on with substance, not ignorance.

The fact is that considerable economic and social progress has been made in Slovakia, and continues at a commendable pace.

It is not perfect but what the country has achieved, in spite of its politicians, crooked or otherwise, deserves due praise.

GM Sanchez,
Oceanside, California, USA

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