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Slovakia supports entry of Germany and Japan into reformed UN Security Council

SLOVAKIA supports the entry of Germany and Japan in a reformed structure of the UN Security Council (UN SC), journalists were told by State Secretary of Foreign Affairs Ministry, Magdalena Vášáryová, during a panel discussion on the occasion of the UN's 60th anniversary on October 25.

Discussion participants spoke about Slovakia's mission during the next two years as a non-permanent UN Security Council member, the news wire TASR wrote.

"Slovakia officially promised to help Japan and Germany, because we think that these two countries are among the biggest financial contributors to UN activities and deserve the right to decide about the UN system and structures," Vášáryová said.

According to her, the UN SC should be more democratic, since only the victorious countries from World War II are permanently represented there.

Slovakia wants to show, by the gesture of support for Japan and Germany that these two countries, which lost in WWII are considered today as pillars of democracy in the world and their work in the world is enormous, according to Vášáryová.

Slovakia, as a member of the UN Security Council, wants to focus on solving the situation in the Western Balkans, Eastern Europe and the status of Kosovo and Cyprus, during its membership of the SC.

Vášáryová also mentioned Afghanistan and Iraq and that the Foreign Affairs Ministry want the public to be more familiar with this matter.

Political analyst Ivo Samson, of the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO), thinks that Slovakia as a non-permanent member of the UN SC will be exposed to certain dilemmas concerning delicate issues to do with conflicts in the Middle East, the Balkans and Kosovo.

Compiled by Beata Balogová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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