Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

IN SHORT

Politicians keep the clamp on press

POLITICIANS decided to retain a clause in the Slovak Penal Code that could be used to send journalists to jail for five years.

The clause, which was included in the Penal Code in May 2005 on the basis of a proposal by the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union MP Roman Vavrík, states that a breach of verbal confidentiality may be punished.

Journalists insisted that this clause would cripple investigative journalism, effectively making secret recordings illegal.

Justice Minister Daniel Lipšic proposed that the clause be omitted from the Penal Code but on October 26 MPs rejected the proposal.

The minister said that the clause prevents investigative journalism and could easily be misused. As an example of misuse he cited the case of a woman who recently secretly filmed her dentist demanding sex for fixing her teeth. Lipšic said that under the clause the woman could be punished.

According to the SME daily, Zuzana Krútka, the head of the Slovak Syndicate of Journalists, is appalled and wonders why the politicians have decided to retain the clause.

Krútka does not think that journalists should publish all recordings that they make in secret but insists that investigative journalism is necessary for society and sometimes such recordings are necessary.

"The role of investigative journalism is to help citizens and we cannot do that without these practices [secret recordings]," she told the daily.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Collector Eugen Bárkány did not distinguish between high and low art

The Jewish Community Museum pays a tribute to its initiator.

Eugen Bárkány painting in old Bratislava.

How do you feel about your city?

Project gathering the feelings of citizens helps define the areas people like to go to and the perceived no-go zones.

Illustrative Stock Photo

Slovak government will provide special treatment for Volkswagen Slovakia

It will help with recruiting new employees, including from abroad.

PM Peter Pellegrini and Ralf Sacht, chairman of the Board of Management at Volkswagen Slovakia, from right

Last Week in Slovakia: Kiska gave a harsh state of the republic address Audio

Listen to all the headlines from The Slovak Spectator's news podcast.

Andrej Kiska