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Reader feedback: What is so right wing?

Re: Fine-tuning reformsm, Flash News, October 25, 2005-10-26

In order for Slovakia to change from a Communist system to a market-oriented one, where membership of NATO and the EU were also sought, many things had to change.

The government under Mr Mečiar started the changes, even if it perhaps travelled on the gravy train a little too often, and regarded the opinion of foreign entities as belittling of a new sovereign state, rather than judging it on merit.

Next came the government headed by Mr Dzurinda. This time, the gravy train was much less used, and advice given by foreign entities was taken up much more as a guide. This history is now written, and it appears that Slovakia is currently well positioned to move further forward in the direction of becoming a modern western state.

What bugs me is that the term "right wing reforms" is used in the article. What is so particularly right wing about them? And is it possible to reform in a left-wing way, where the same status and level of development will be achieved?

Perhaps politicians carrying the label "left wing" can do it, but conforming to the West (the West as in the EU-15 in particular), requires the reform, whether it be done in a left, right, or centrist fashion.

Oscar,
Radošovce, Slovakia

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