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General prosecutor proposes outlawing extremist party

PROSECUTOR General Dobroslav Trnka filed a motion with the Supreme Court to dissolve the extremist party Slovenská pospolitosť, the daily SME reported.

If the court agrees to the request, it will be the first time in Slovakia’s history that the state has ordered the dissolution of a political party.

Human rights activists People Against Racism have been trying to make Slovak officials take steps against the party, members of which wear uniforms similar to the police militia of the wartime fascist puppet state (1939-1945), the Hlinka's guard.

The activists claim that the party's activities breach several laws.

There has been a discussion of whether extremist groups such as Slovenská pospolitosť should receive media space for disseminating their statements.

Political scientist Miroslav Kusý says it is necessary to talk about them but the media should not give them more importance than they have. However, it needs to be stressed what is harmful in their activities, the daily concluded.

Compiled by Beata Balogová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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