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White Lady of Levoča

PEOPLE wandering around the city walls of Levoča in the past would come across a niche with a picture of the legendary White Lady calling them to enter the city.

Click to enlarge.

PEOPLE wandering around the city walls of Levoča in the past would come across a niche with a picture of the legendary White Lady calling them to enter the city.

Unlike the Lady of Čachtice, the White Lady of the Spiš region was not bloodthirsty, but tricky.

Legend has it that Juliana Korponajová (Julia Korponay) let the Habsburg army into the besieged city of Levoča, which at the time of the Francis Rákóczi uprising (early 18th century) was in the hands of Hungarian rebels.

Famous Spiš painter Forberger captured the act in the niche, built at the end of the 19th century.

However, Juliana's honour has become the stuff of people's fantasy. The truth is that she sided with the rebels and after she admitted being in contact with them, she was charged with treason and executed on September 25, 1719.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

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