Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

IN SHORT

Slovaks: post-Revolution life is no better

ONLY one fifth of Slovaks think that their lives have improved since the fall of Communism in 1989.

In contrast, 16 years after the fall of Communism, more than 40 percent of the population thinks that political change has brought deterioration in their lives, according to an MVK agency poll conducted for the daily SME.

The Velvet Revolution brought neither improvement nor deterioration according to 26 percent of respondents, while 12 percent did not know if the new political structure had brought any change to their lives. It is mainly older people who are not satisfied. Eighty percent of people over 70 expressed dissatisfaction.

According to political analyst Miroslav Kusý, the results of the poll are not surprising. He considers scepticism as natural to human nature and that people see things as much worse than they really are.

Fedor Gál, one of the personalities of the Velvet Revolution of 1989, reproached those who criticize for having short memories. "They should remember how they were, what they were taught at schools, what they read, what they could publicly speak about, where they could travel and what they were able to buy in shops. Also, that doing business was a crime and the unemployed were put in prison as parasites," he said.

Top stories

Voters don’t understand self-governing regions

Rules for regional elections change, which may bring some surprising victories.

One of the biggest fights is expected in Banská Bystrica Region.

Sagan rewrites history Video

Cyclist Peter Sagan becomes the first man to win three consecutive world championships. He allegedly did not expect it and was easy with the idea he would not win.

Blog: Why did I come here?

A group of teachers and students from the Bratislava-based school gathered to support their friend, colleague, and fellow foreigner, as she had already tried four times just to get in the door of the foreign police.

Queue in front of the foreigners' police department in Bratislava.

Teachers and scientist support anti-corruption march

They praise the activities of students who may change the current state of corruption.

Organisers of the first student protest, Karolína Farská and Dávid Straka.