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HISTORY TALKS.....

Vrútky

THE TOWN of Vrútky, pictured here in the 1920s, lies in the Turiec region near the Váh River. Its entire history is connected with this river.

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THE TOWN of Vrútky, pictured here in the 1920s, lies in the Turiec region near the Váh River. Its entire history is connected with this river.

For many years the Váh served as the fastest, but also the most dangerous traffic artery in the country. The "submissive servant" could become a "deadly enemy" come the rains and the melting snow. The frequent floods had far-reaching consequences.

A traffic controller used to reside at the river. He directed the floating rafts and the unloading of goods. The rafters had to use identity cards to enter the Trenčín region.

The town did not only control traffic on the Váh but also on the overland roads around the town. Vrútky citizens did not want vagrants from outside begging in the town. They marked local beggars with the letters "C" and "I", and alien ones were sent to prison in the neighbouring town of Martin.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

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