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Reader feedback: Bio-ethanol the answer

Re: Running on rapeseed, By Marta Ďurianová, November 28-December 4, 2005

It would not make any sense to use seeds or beets to produce oil. Calculations show that if Germany grew as much rapeseed as the land provides it would only cover 1 to 1.5 percent of fuel consumption.

A much better idea is to make ethanol/alcohol from cereals and potatoes as well as organic waste from households.

Today you can add up to 40 percent bio-ethanol into a petrol engine as it is, and most likely also soon into diesel engines.

There have been many calculations by experts about using seeds for energy.

The pressing of the seeds and the growing of the seeds for fuel (only rape and sun flower seeds are possible) would not only cost too much in energy consumption, but would also destroy the CO2 balance.

Any kind of organic waste or leftovers from agricultural production can now be used to produce bio-ethanol and you do not need huge investments. It is a very simple technique for which no sophisticated equipment is needed.

Given the political will to introduce the legislation and a slight decrease in taxes on those types of fuel and we are there.

Jesper,
Denmark

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