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Tax authority publishes list of debtors

THE SLOVAK Republic's Tax Directorate published a list of tax debtors as of December 31, 2004. The sum of outstanding taxes of corporate entities, according to the list, was at Sk32.1 billion (€824 million) by the end of last December.

Of this sum, corporate entities owed Sk17 billion (€436 million) in value-added tax and Sk9.2 billion (€236 million) in income tax, the SITA news agency reported.

Overdue taxes from private individuals reached Sk9.8 billion (€252 million) at the end of last year, of which Sk4.7 billion (€121 million) was outstanding value-added tax and Sk3.6 billion (€95 million) outstanding income tax.

The Tax Directorate registered 4,443 debtors by the end of December, of which 3,005 were private individuals and 1,438 corporate entities.

The law on tax and fees administration obliges the Tax Directorate to publish a list of debtors for the previous year in the second half of the current year at the latest. The list includes individual tax debtors who owed at least Sk500,000 (€128,000).

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