Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS.....

Ďumbier

THE LOW Tatras are more accessible now than they have ever been. There is virtually nowhere an ordinary tourist cannot reach. Nevertheless, these mountains have not had to cope with the number of tourists their more famous neighbours, the High Tatras, have.

Click to enlarge.

THE LOW Tatras are more accessible now than they have ever been. There is virtually nowhere an ordinary tourist cannot reach. Nevertheless, these mountains have not had to cope with the number of tourists their more famous neighbours, the High Tatras, have.

This difference affected the building of accommodation facilities for visitors to these mountains. The start of the last century saw entire hotel communities and many alpine cottages erected in the High Tatras.

But with the exception of the Korytnica spa, the Low Tatras offered rather sporadic housing. One such building was this cottage, seen here in the 1930s.

The modest Štefánikova chata (Štefánik Cottage) was built of stones and stood under the Low Tatras' highest peak, the 2,045-metre high Ďumbier. A tourist trail winding along the range's main ridge now crosses the mountain's main peak. The massif in the background is called Veľký Gápeľ but there is no trail leading to it.


Prepared by Branislav Chovan

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Slovakia has extradited Yandiev to Russia

Despite the UN decision, the country sent Ingushetia citizen Aslan Yandiev to Russia where he is wanted for alleged terrorism crimes. It cites the stance of the ECHR.

Illustrative stock photo

More reasons to stay

Excluding people doesn’t just affect those who choose to leave.

Creator of the Krav Maga self-defense system was from Bratislava Photo

The versatile athlete Imi Lichtenfeld finally has a memorial plaque in the Slovak capital.

Unveiling of the commemorative plaque: curator Michal Vaněk, Yaron Lichtenstein, BKIS director Vladimír Grežo and Museum of Jewish Culture's director Pavol Mešťan, from left.

Construction of underground roundabout changes traffic flow on Bratislava’s Mlynské Nivy

Mlynské Nivy Street will be transformed into a modern boulevard by the autumn of 2019.

New construction on Mlynské Nivy Street.