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Poll: Frustration growing eastwards

A POLL carried out by the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO) found that people perceive themselves as having less opportunity the further east in the country they live, the daily SME reported.

In the Bratislava region only 6 percent of respondents said they considered their opportunities to be fewer, in relation to the Slovak average. In regions in eastern Slovakia, this proportion rose to as much as 90 percent.

“Moving further east, people’s positive evaluation of their situation gradually changes to being very critical,” said IVO’s Zora Bútorová.

In her opinion the growing frustration eastwards essentially reflects the regional disparities in Slovakia.

In the Prešov, Košice and Banská Bystrica regions, the unemployment rate and the number of people living in material distress is growing. The number of people who have only completed elementary education, or not even completed elementary education, is also growing.

Compiled by Martina Jurinová from press reports
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