Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

IN SHORT

Slovak children can’t use what they learn

SLOVAK students do not know how to apply the knowledge they learn in school. They also lag behind their peers from developed countries in math, natural sciences and reading skills, according to a report from the OECD economic group.

SLOVAK students do not know how to apply the knowledge they learn in school. They also lag behind their peers from developed countries in math, natural sciences and reading skills, according to a report from the OECD economic group.

The OECD, which tested the 15-year-olds in 57 countries, presented its report on the Slovak education system on December 4, the Pravda daily wrote.

More than one-quarter of Slovak students have no understanding of the content of what they are reading. They are able to explain scientific knowledge, but only by using a theorem.

Teachers attribute the poor results to obsolete teaching methods and the state’s under-funding of education.

“In Slovakia, children are still memorising and the curriculum is not linked with the real life,” Alena Petáková, the director of the Elementary School at Malokarpatské Námestie in Bratislava, told the daily.

Slovak students have become worse at math. Three years ago they reached the OECD average, but now they are below-average. In the other subjects that were surveyed, Slovak students stayed the same.

In the OECD ranking, Slovakia lags behind the other members of the Visegrad Four (the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland), with one exception. Hungary is one point behind Slovakia in math.

Children from Finland, Hong Kong, Korea and Canada scored the best in the OECD tests.

Top stories

Coalition only agrees on how to talk. But what will they talk about?

Budget talks to decide on concrete policies. Danko wants airplanes, Fico wants better pay for nights and weekends.

Danko, Fico, Bugar.

Cloud computing becomes a standard

External servers are now much more secure than local business ones, according to experts.

Slovak firms have their eyes on the cloud.

Slovaks drink less and less

Behind the decline in alcohol consumption is, for example, the abandoning of the habit of drinking at work – typical especially during communism, according to an expert.

Kiska: Even Europe has its aggressive neighbour

President Andrej Kiska addressed UN commenting poverty, instability and climate change.

President Andrej Kiska