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AROUND SLOVAKIA - DETVA

September - Arrested man claims cannabis plants were ‘insulation’

AN ANTI-DRUG raid that netted more than 100 kilograms of cannabis from the garden of a family house in Vígľašská Huť in early September had a surprise ending for police. An examination failed to confirm that the cannabis plants contained THC, the chemical in marijuana that produces a “high”.

AN ANTI-DRUG raid that netted more than 100 kilograms of cannabis from the garden of a family house in Vígľašská Huť in early September had a surprise ending for police. An examination failed to confirm that the cannabis plants contained THC, the chemical in marijuana that produces a “high”.

In spite of this, the owner of the plants faces a charge of illegal production of drugs and imprisonment up to five years, the Pravda daily wrote. Prosecutors are already dealing with the case.

Police seized more than 4,300 marijuana plants, weighing 106 kilograms in total, growing outside a family home near Detva. In Slovakia, cannabis is on the list of psychotropic substances and growing it is only legal for industrial purposes. However, the Criminal Law does not include anything about THC-free cannabis.

A 37-year-old man from Prešov has been charged, not for directly producing or storing drugs, but for keeping an instrument for the illegal production of drugs.

The man said he wanted to use the cannabis to insulate the roof of his family house.

“I almost froze during the winter two years ago,” he told Pravda. “So I decided to fill in the ceiling. Because cannabis is a very good insulation material, I bought certified cannabis in the Czech Republic and planted it.”

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