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Heat prices to grow 0.4 percent

The price of heat for households will grow 0.4 percent on average next year. Regulatory Board head Jozef Holjenčík told the press on December 18 that the average price of heat will reach Sk538 per gigajoule in 2008.

The price of heat for households will grow 0.4 percent on average next year. Regulatory Board head Jozef Holjenčík told the press on December 18 that the average price of heat will reach Sk538 per gigajoule in 2008.

The cost of drinking water will rise by 5.65 percent on average and fees for sewage water treatment by 5.16 percent. According to Holjenčík, the regulatory office has not finished all price procedures within the heat sector yet. The Regulatory Office for Network Industries (URSO) received 322 price proposals from heat producers. So far, the office has decided on 207. According to heat utilities, heat prices should grow by 10 percent. They argue that the gas utility Slovenský Plynárenský Priemysel raised the price of natural gas, which makes up 65 percent of the price of heat, by 10 to 15 percent. Holjenčík said that heat utilities have not yet sent new price proposals to the authority.

The regulatory board head did not rule out that heat utilities will deliver new price proposals. In case the economic conditions, i.e., input prices of natural gas, changed dramatically, the companies are authorized to submit new price drafts. Such a change has not yet occurred.

The fees for the distribution of drinking water will range from Sk19.78 to Sk32 per cubic metre without VAT, depending on water utilities. Fees for sewage water treatment will be Sk20 to Sk25.50 per cubic metre without VAT. Next year, average fees for drinking water and sewage water treatment will reach Sk48.69 per cubic metre without VAT, which is a 5.42-percent increase y/y. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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