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Christian Democrats oppose rush to ratify Lisbon Treaty

The opposition Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) is the only party in parliament so far that has voiced objections to ratifying the EU Reform Treaty (also known as the Lisbon Treaty). According to the party, prior to the ratification, Prime Minister Robert Fico and Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška should present its text to the public and only then ask parliament for its approval. The KDH deputy chairman for foreign affairs, Martin Fronc, said this in response to statements by senior representatives that they want to push through the adoption of the treaty as early as at the parliamentary session in January.

The opposition Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) is the only party in parliament so far that has voiced objections to ratifying the EU Reform Treaty (also known as the Lisbon Treaty). According to the party, prior to the ratification, Prime Minister Robert Fico and Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška should present its text to the public and only then ask parliament for its approval. The KDH deputy chairman for foreign affairs, Martin Fronc, said this in response to statements by senior representatives that they want to push through the adoption of the treaty as early as at the parliamentary session in January.

Christian Democrats perceive this as irresponsible and politically inappropriate. Smer is completely sidelining the public on the issue because it doesn’t care about informing anyone about the treaty, Fronc said.

EU member states have until the end of the year to ratify the Lisbon Treaty. The KDH claims that a speedy approval would violate a significant principle of the EU – bridging the gap between the citizenry and government.

The content of the EU Reform Treaty is aimed at improving efficiency in light of the re-cent enlargement from 15 to 27 members. Signed by European leaders on December 13, 2007, it calls for the number of European Parliament deputies and EU Commissioners to be reduced from 785 to 750; allows each EU state to have a representative in the European Commission from 2014; and limits the number of commissioners together with the EC president and the high representative for foreign affairs and security policy to two thirds of the member states. The commissioners will be appointed by EU states based on a rotating basis. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

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