BUSINESS IN SHORT

Czech power station coming to Košice

THE CZECH energy company ČEZ is continuing its move into the Slovak electricity production market. Only one month after it agreed to build a steam-gas facility at the Slovnaft oil refinery in Bratislava, it signed a memorandum of understanding that could let it generate power on the premises of the U.S. Steel Košice steelworks, the Hospodárske Noviny daily wrote.

THE CZECH energy company ČEZ is continuing its move into the Slovak electricity production market. Only one month after it agreed to build a steam-gas facility at the Slovnaft oil refinery in Bratislava, it signed a memorandum of understanding that could let it generate power on the premises of the U.S. Steel Košice steelworks, the Hospodárske Noviny daily wrote.

ČEZ plans to build a 400-megawatt facility at the steelworks – about half of the output of the facility planned for Slovnaft.

The exact capacity, as well as the type of fuel, will be known after a feasibility study into the project. The study should be finished by the middle of 2008, ČEZ spokesperson Eva Nováková told the daily.

The power station in Bratislava will be fuelled by natural gas, but coal might be used for electricity production in Košice.

ČEZ has been declaring its interest to penetrate the Slovak energy market for the last few years.

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