Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Minister Harabin blasts Special Court

Justice Minister Štefan Harabin levelled sharp criticism at the Special Court and its judges during an appearance on Slovak Television on February 16.

Justice Minister Štefan Harabin levelled sharp criticism at the Special Court and its judges during an appearance on Slovak Television on February 16.

The justice minister compared the existence of a Special Court to the structure of the judiciary in Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy, and said Slovakia's Special Court judges, who earn Sk200,000 a month, should work during Christmas and Easter in addition to weekends.

Harabin also said the Special Court isn't independent enough, as the judges are appointed rather than elected.

"Countries like Spain have a Special Court, but there is terrorism there," he said.

Harabin's predecessor, SDKÚ-DS MP Lucia Žitňanská, said that the public’s high confidence in the court outweighs the opinion of a “biased” minister.

Žitňanská said the Special Court is more scrutinised than any court in the country. Journalists attend every hearing and each of its cases is reported and analysed in the media, she said.

Earlier this month, the Constitutional Court received a motion from 46 ruling coalition MPs asking it to examine whether the Special Court and Special Prosecutor's Office are in line with the Constitution.

The MPs, headed by ĽS-HZDS chairman Vladimír Mečiar, argue that both institutions violate not only the Slovak Constitution, but the Convention on the Protection of Human Rights and the UN Convention against Corruption. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

How rock music helped bring down the totalitarian regime Video

A new film shows that Rock & Roll, forbidden in the Soviet Union, helped to end the Cold War.

Illustrative Stock Photo

Movies under an open sky feel differently than in an air-conditioned cinema Photo

The popularity of outdoor cinemas is increasing in Bratislava

Bažant Kinematograf on the Magio Pláž beach

Peter Sagan announces split with his wife Katarína

The Slovak cycling star who has a young son said “It will be much better this way”.

Peter Sagan marries Katarína, November 2015.

Top 3 news from Last Week in Slovakia Video

Slovakia to buy 14 American fighter jets.

This archive picture from 2014 shows an older model of the F-16 fighter jets.