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IT UPDATES TO CHANGE PUBLIC SECTOR

Education system to get IT overhaul

A MODERNISATION plan approved by the Government in February will pour Sk11 billion (€340 million) into elementary and secondary schools over the next four years. The money, two thirds of which will be made up of European Union funds, will be used for purchasing computers, internet connections, training seminars and other items that will make the education system a pillar of the knowledge-based economy, Trend magazine wrote.

A MODERNISATION plan approved by the Government in February will pour Sk11 billion (€340 million) into elementary and secondary schools over the next four years. The money, two thirds of which will be made up of European Union funds, will be used for purchasing computers, internet connections, training seminars and other items that will make the education system a pillar of the knowledge-based economy, Trend magazine wrote.

This will make the education sector a much more lucrative field for IT suppliers. The Infovek project that ran 1999 to 2007 put only Sk1.5 billion into schools.

The Education Ministry is also planning to revise its list of IT expenses. A Sk20,000 PC will be given to every two teachers and 8,000 teachers who fulfil criteria yet to be specified will be eligible for a monthly Sk400 subsidy towards a personal internet connection. All teachers will be provided with IT training.

About Sk1.2 billion is earmarked for creating educational applications and websites and translating already existing programmes into Slovak.

The ministry is also thinking big when it comes to computers in schools. Every elementary school will have one PC per 10 students and secondary schools will have one PC per five students. This will increase the current number of PCs by 114,000. The ministry is estimating that each PC will cost Sk15,000, which means a bill of Sk1.7 billion.

Topic: IT


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