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Solidarity march for Cuban opposition

ABOUT 50 Bratislavans joined a march in solidarity with the Ladies in White Cuban opposition movement in the capital on March 17. Priests Anton Srholec and Daniel Pastirčák, and politicians Vladimír Palko, František Mikloško and Ján Čarnogurský attended the march organised by the Pontis Foundation and the NGO People in Peril. Former Cuban political prisoner Osvaldo Alfonso Valdes also marched in Bratislava, the SITA newswire wrote.

ABOUT 50 Bratislavans joined a march in solidarity with the Ladies in White Cuban opposition movement in the capital on March 17. Priests Anton Srholec and Daniel Pastirčák, and politicians Vladimír Palko, František Mikloško and Ján Čarnogurský attended the march organised by the Pontis Foundation and the NGO People in Peril. Former Cuban political prisoner Osvaldo Alfonso Valdes also marched in Bratislava, the SITA newswire wrote.

The Slovak NGOs organised their march through the streets of Bratislava in common with the Ladies in White in Cuba, who peacefully demonstrate in Havana each Sunday, said Pontis' Vladimír Vladár.

"I was persecuted during the communist regime," said Mikloško. "I had to go for interrogations. I was only two days in jail, but I know what solidarity from outside means," said Mikloško.

Ladies in White is an opposition movement in Cuba that unites the spouses and other relatives of 75 dissidents and journalists jailed by the Cuban government. The women protest the imprisonment of their kin by silently walking through the streets after attending holy mass each Sunday.

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