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NEW ENERGY PLANTS IN THE PIPELINE

New thermal power stations on the horizon

CHEMICALS producer Chemko Strážske recently commissioned a study to evaluate the environmental impact of adding a thermal power plant to its site.

CHEMICALS producer Chemko Strážske recently commissioned a study to evaluate the environmental impact of adding a thermal power plant to its site.

The plant is estimated to cost Sk12.5 billion (€385 million) and have a capacity of 350 megawatts. Its construction will require 750 workers, who will begin building it next year and finish in 2012.

"The plant's operation will need 125 employees, 75 of them current and 50 new," the company's environmental study concluded.

The thermal plant will supply 2,310 gigawatt-hours of power to the network and have a lifespan of 25 years, the study said. Its main source of fuel will be coal from Ukraine, Russia, Poland and the Czech Republic.

Chemko Strážske's future plans include constructing yet another thermal power plant as part of the "Strážske Power Plant 750 MWs" project, the SITA newswire wrote.

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