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CULTURE SHORTS

Documentary heads to Karlovy Vary festival

SLEPÉ LÁSKY (Blind Loves), a documentary by Juraj Lehotský, has been entered into the 43rd International Karlovy Vary film festival in the Czech Republic, the SITA newswire wrote.

SLEPÉ LÁSKY (Blind Loves), a documentary by Juraj Lehotský, has been entered into the 43rd International Karlovy Vary film festival in the Czech Republic, the SITA newswire wrote.

It premieres in Slovakia on March 27 as a double bill along with Štyri (Four), an animated short by Ivana Šebestová.

Slepé Lásky is about the lives of four blind people who are looking for love and acceptance. It was co-produced by Marko Škop, whose documentary Iné svety (Other Worlds), about his native Šariš region, was awarded an honourable mention at the prestigious festival in 2006.

The documentary enters the lives of Peter, a blind teacher with a very unique imagination and a happy marriage behind the walls of his small apartment; Miro, a blind Roma man who falls in love with a visually impaired white girl and must fight for her love; Elena, a blind woman who longs to be a mother; and Zuzana, a blind teenager who finds love through the internet.

Slepé Lásky was made with special sound technology that makes it accessible to the visually impaired.

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