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Conference on intercultural dialogue opens

On March 31, Culture Minister Marek Maďarič opened a conference called 'Diversity Connects - Intercultural Dialogue 2008' in Bratislava.

On March 31, Culture Minister Marek Maďarič opened a conference called 'Diversity Connects - Intercultural Dialogue 2008' in Bratislava.

According to him, the EU has been supporting dialogue between cultures for a number of years. In Slovakia, however, only non-governmental organisations have paid attention to this sphere until now. The ministry, therefore, intends to move it to a national level. He thinks intercultural dialogue involves mutual co-operation, perception and understanding between cultures, which then get to know themselves and the world around them in all its variety. Slovak Deputy PM for European Affairs, Human Rights and Minorities Dušan Čaplovič called the issue of intercultural dialogue a very up-to-date topic.

"The dialogue shouldn't only apply to autonomous minorities, but also to migration minorities that are coming to Europe, including to Slovakia and the Schengen zone," added Čaplovič. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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