Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Cabinet to discuss human rights cases, Roma education

Complaints against the Slovak Republic arriving at the European Court for Human Rights fell in number last year, compared to 2006, the SITA newswire wrote. While the court examined 486 complaints in 2006, there were 347 in 2007. In 286 cases the court decided to turn down the complaint or erase it from the list, with the result that the Slovak government was notified of 59 cases, and nineteen were accepted for investigation, according to a report on the activity of Slovakia's representative at the European Court for Human Rights in 2007. Cabinet was due to discuss the report at its regular meeting on April 2.

Complaints against the Slovak Republic arriving at the European Court for Human Rights fell in number last year, compared to 2006, the SITA newswire wrote. While the court examined 486 complaints in 2006, there were 347 in 2007. In 286 cases the court decided to turn down the complaint or erase it from the list, with the result that the Slovak government was notified of 59 cases, and nineteen were accepted for investigation, according to a report on the activity of Slovakia's representative at the European Court for Human Rights in 2007. Cabinet was due to discuss the report at its regular meeting on April 2.

In addition, the Education Minister, Ján Mikolaj, was due to submit a draft Concept on the Upbringing and Education of Roma Children and Pupils, which includes proposals regarding the development of high school and university education. According to the ministry, mandatory pre-school education, reduction of the school curriculum, appointment of teachers’ assistants, the establishment of preparatory classes, and the creation of a multicultural environment are sensible and inevitable. It also says a reduction in class sizes is necessary.

The Education Ministry intends to improve Roma children’s preparation for school attendance by introducing pre-schools. It also wants to increase the percentage of Roma students attending high schools and universities, and reduce the number of Roma attending special schools designed for mentally challenged pupils. It also wants to support life-long education of members of the Roma community who have an incomplete education in order to improve their situation in the labour market. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Interior Ministry deactivates services requiring e-signature

The reason is a vulnerability in the chips that are used in Slovak ID cards

Self-governing regions have a mix of competences

Governors and regional councils decide about health care, education and road management.

Orava region under snow...

Being a caregiver was an empty life

The fatal accident of the van carrying Slovak caregivers has opened a discussion on how these women work and live. The job agencies abuse both the drivers and the caregivers, a former caregiver in Austria, Angelika…

Angelika Horňáková

European Commission does not consider the traditional family controversial

Hoaxes that have appeared on the internet in Slovak over the past two weeks

Famil,y illustrative stock photo