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Parliament: lights on by June?

Car drivers should have their headlights turned on throughout the year, says junior coalition partner the Slovak National Party (SNS). SNS MP Jozef Ďuračka submitted an amending proposal to the twentieth session of parliament on April 2 suggesting that the change come into force on June 1 this year, the SITA newswire wrote. MPs are supposed to decide whether to approve the revision on Wednesday afternoon. Parliament had previously approved a proposal obliging drivers to leave their lights on year-round but it was halted when President Ivan Gašparovič refused to sign an amendment to the law on land communication traffic in March 2007 . The President disagreed with the dates for the entry into force of paragraphs related to the minimum speed limit for motor vehicles on highways. At present, drivers need not have their headlights on from March 15 to October 15.

Car drivers should have their headlights turned on throughout the year, says junior coalition partner the Slovak National Party (SNS). SNS MP Jozef Ďuračka submitted an amending proposal to the twentieth session of parliament on April 2 suggesting that the change come into force on June 1 this year, the SITA newswire wrote. MPs are supposed to decide whether to approve the revision on Wednesday afternoon. Parliament had previously approved a proposal obliging drivers to leave their lights on year-round but it was halted when President Ivan Gašparovič refused to sign an amendment to the law on land communication traffic in March 2007 . The President disagreed with the dates for the entry into force of paragraphs related to the minimum speed limit for motor vehicles on highways. At present, drivers need not have their headlights on from March 15 to October 15.

Meanwhile, parliament debated the Cabinet’s draft bill on financial inspection and internal audit. Discussion on the new education bill drafted by Education Minister Ján Mikolaj was due to take place before noon. The new legislation is intended to pave the way for the launch of schools reform in September. The state will set the obligatory syllabus for state education programmes while schools will fill the rest of the curriculum with their own educational programmes. The minister has promised that schools will have more freedom and more room for creativity in classes, and that memorising facts and the unnecessary burden of encyclopaedic knowledge will be eliminated. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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