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AEROFLOT TO RESUME MOSCOW-BRATISLAVA FLIGHTS

Aeroflot to resume Moscow-Bratislava flights

RUSSIAN airline Aeroflot plans to resume regular flights between Moscow and Bratislava on May 27 this year, with two flights a week.

RUSSIAN airline Aeroflot plans to resume regular flights between Moscow and Bratislava on May 27 this year, with two flights a week.

It has not yet signed an agreement with Bratislava airport on beginning the new flights but this is expected to happen shortly. Aeroflot’s Bratislava office confirmed the planned resumption of flights to Bratislava to the SITA newswire. However, they did not specify any date for signing an agreement. Aeroflot plans to use a Tupolev TU-154 plane on the new route.

Slovak Airlines operated the direct connection between Bratislava and Moscow until the end of last year. After the company went bankrupt in 2007 it was forced to cancel the Moscow route, as well as flights to Brussels and its other activities. Low-cost carrier SkyEurope also remains interested in opening regular flights between Bratislava and Moscow. Its spokesman Tomáš Kika confirmed to SITA that talks about acquisition of rights on this route continue based on a bilateral agreement on aviation transport between Slovakia and Russia.

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Topic: Transport


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