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Fresh is best, say shoppers

When buying food, some 85 percent of Slovaks are looking for freshness and quality; the second most-important factor (just under 80 percent), especially among the non-urban population, is price, according to the 'Shopping Monitor 2007' survey published by GfK Slovakia on April 8.

When buying food, some 85 percent of Slovaks are looking for freshness and quality; the second most-important factor (just under 80 percent), especially among the non-urban population, is price, according to the 'Shopping Monitor 2007' survey published by GfK Slovakia on April 8.

Responses to the question ‘what do you rate as most important when buying food?’ suggested that having a wide range of products was the third most-important factor (for almost 70 percent of respondents); well-displayed prices and the cleanliness of the shop came in fourth and fifth respectively, with over 60 percent of customers rating them as important.

Ranking sixth in the scale of importance - for 60 percent of Slovaks - is the speed at which their purchases are processed at the check-out, the TASR newswire reported. The survey also revealed that customers were concerned about whether staff were pleasant and helpful (60 percent); they also paid attention to the ambience of a shop and the overall impression it created. Important for some 50 percent of customers were shops’ hours of business and accessibility. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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