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NDS to decide on toll tender results by May 16

The National Highway Company (NDS) must rule on the appeals of three excluded candidates in the third electronic toll collection tender in a seven-day period by May 16, according to the public procurement law.

The National Highway Company (NDS) must rule on the appeals of three excluded candidates in the third electronic toll collection tender in a seven-day period by May 16, according to the public procurement law.

The three companies used the first option for revaluation of the NDS verdict and appealed by May 9. A consortium led by the Austrian company Kapsch TrafficCom; the Slovak-Swiss consortium ToSy.sk, headed by Elektrovod Holding; and Slovakpass, led by the Italian company Autostrade, filed motions requesting a review of the decision to exclude them from the tender, the companies’ representatives told the SITA newswire.

They said they consider the NDS’s arguments groundless and hope they will be returned into the competition. The SanToll-Ibertax group, backed by the French highway company Sanef, is the unofficial winner of the tender, even though its bid for the electronic toll collection system was the highest.

If the NDS refuses to review the expulsions, the excluded candidates can appeal to the Public Procurement Office (ÚVO) within seven days. The office will have 30 days to decide. If the ÚVO accepts some of the objections raised and orders the return of any of the excluded candidates into the competition, the NDS must respect this and re-evaluate the bid. Nonetheless, the NDS can turn it down again. If the ÚVO rejects all objections, the NDS can announce the official outcome of the competition. The assessment could thus be made public in the second half of June.

Construction of an electronic toll collection system requires eight months, according to the competition profile. The full operation of the system could thus start no sooner than late February or early March 2009. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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