Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS...

Apothecaries

THE FIRST mention of apothecaries in Slovakia comes from the seventeenth century, when they went door to door selling medicine. They offered a unique and varied assortment of healing oils made from arolla pines, dwarf pines, juniper berries, rosemary, fennel and pine cones. They also sold healing ointments and herbs.

THE FIRST mention of apothecaries in Slovakia comes from the seventeenth century, when they went door to door selling medicine. They offered a unique and varied assortment of healing oils made from arolla pines, dwarf pines, juniper berries, rosemary, fennel and pine cones. They also sold healing ointments and herbs.

The apothecaries made the oils by distilling or pressing crumbled twigs, sprigs and seeds. But some were frauds who obtained medicine from pharmacists and added ineffective ingredients to justify selling it at a much higher price. The Turiec region had the highest population of apothecaries. As many as 40 villages there had one.

By the first half of the nineteenth century apothecaries had expanded their market to all of Eastern Europe and the German-speaking countries. Some of them became very wealthy, but usually frittered their newfound wealth away on aristocratic titles or fancy clothing.

This postcard from around World War II shows a “pudla”, a box in which apothecaries kept their goods and equipment, though they often hired someone to carry it.

Top stories

Governmental campaign should bring Slovaks home from the UK

The Slovak cabinet plans to persuade its expats living and working in the UK with at least a bachelor degree to return home: a campaign offering specific jobs should help.

Young researchers, IT experts and medical staffers are needed in Slovakia, illustrative stock photo.

EU lawyers claiming the Russian annexation of Crimea as legal is a hoax

One lawyer does not mean all EU lawyers; immigrants attacking a shepherd dog and HAARP causing hurricanes in the US are hoaxes, too.

Hoax on immigrants attackign two German shepdherds and ebing bitten yb them

Co-founder and co-owner of Sme daily dies

A major Slovak entrepreneur, Peter Vajda, died in Prague on October 15. He was exceptional for his innate sense of democracy and believing in equal opportunities for all.

Peter Vajda

Šefčovič: Slovakia’s economy has grown 60 percent since joining the EU

Slovak consumers are growing economically stronger and will be an important stabilisation factor in the future

European Commission Vice-president for Energy Union Maroš Šefčovič