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Ice-hockey player Uram to guard Presidential Palace after losing bet

President Ivan Gašparovič will acquire a new “member” of his Honour Guard in a couple of weeks when ice-hockey player Marek Uram stands guard at the Presidential Palace, the TASR newswire was told by presidential spokesperson Marek Trubač on June 1.

President Ivan Gašparovič will acquire a new “member” of his Honour Guard in a couple of weeks when ice-hockey player Marek Uram stands guard at the Presidential Palace, the TASR newswire was told by presidential spokesperson Marek Trubač on June 1.

Uram, who recently won the Slovak Ice-hockey Championships with Slovan Bratislava, will soon swap his skates and stick for a rifle and uniform after losing a bet with the president. He scored fewer hockey goals with a tennis ball than Gašparovič in a special contest at the opening of a new multi-functional sports ground with an artificial surface in Bojna (Nitra region).

An enthusiastic ice-hockey fan, Gašparovič didn't shy away from taking on a professional player, scoring twice in four shots, with Uram managing to find the net only once. It should be noted that Uram had to shoot from twice as far out as the president did, and the way that the ball bounced on the artificial surface also tended to even things out a little. The well-known Slovan and Slovak national team player made a bet with Gašparovič that if the president lost, he would have to get on a resurfacer and smooth out the ice at Slovan Bratislava's hockey stadium before a game. As Uram lost, he will have to don a uniform and stand in front of the Presidential Palace on June 13 at the building's Open Day, remaining motionless for a full 15 minutes. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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