Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

President Gašparovič signs several revisions into law, vetoes one

President Ivan Gašparovič approved several new laws on June 4, but refused to sign a bill that would have penalised parents for allowing drinking by minors, the SITA newswire reported. The draft would also have imposed a duty on teachers, school principals, doctors and the police to report drinking by youngsters under 18 to a municipality. It will now return to parliament, with a recommendation from the president that its terminology be clarified.

President Ivan Gašparovič approved several new laws on June 4, but refused to sign a bill that would have penalised parents for allowing drinking by minors, the SITA newswire reported. The draft would also have imposed a duty on teachers, school principals, doctors and the police to report drinking by youngsters under 18 to a municipality. It will now return to parliament, with a recommendation from the president that its terminology be clarified.

Gašparovič signed into law a revision on free access to information. This obliges public employees to provide information to visually-impaired people in an appropriate form. It will enter into force in early 2009.

Also becoming law is a revised act on electronic signatures, which introduces modified terminology, specifies the role of the National Security Office, and defines procedures in assessing the conformity of security devices for creating and verifying electronic signatures with security requirements set by the law. The amendment will take effect on January 1, 2009.

The President also signed into law a revision to the Labour Code. It bans retail outlets in Slovakia from opening on Easter Sunday, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day, and requires them to close at noon on Christmas Eve. The rules will not apply to petrol stations, pharmacies, hospitals, airports, ports and other public transport facilities, or to shops selling travel tickets or souvenirs. The revised law also imposes a duty on employers to guarantee each employee a minimum of 35 hours of continuous rest weekly. This should include a Sunday and part of the day before or after it. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

What are the biggest challenges of Slovak journalism?

Trust in the media slightly increased following the murder of journalist but it may not last.

Measles continue spreading in the east

From the original source of infection, the village of Drahňov, the infected who violated quarantine rules have spread measles to other places. Six cases also involve medical staffers.

Vaccine, illustrative stock photo

Signs of danger averted

The world has never been this safe, and may never be again.

Canada Pacific coast

Parliamentary committee disagrees over President Kiska’s campaign financing

Some members believe Kiska clearly violated the law while others are criticising the committee for acting outside of its jurisdiction.

Andrej Kiska