HISTORY TALKS...

Wayside shrines

THIS POSTCARD from the 1920s is a reproduction of a painting by Václav Malý, a Czech artist. The picture depicts a romantic panorama of the High Tatras, with a cross in the foreground.

THIS POSTCARD from the 1920s is a reproduction of a painting by Václav Malý, a Czech artist. The picture depicts a romantic panorama of the High Tatras, with a cross in the foreground.

In the Middle Ages, roads and squares were "graced" with gallows and scaffolds rather than crucifixes.

It wasn't until after the Trident Council (1545-1563), which declared the second half of the 16th century the "Century of Saints," that crucifixes, chapels and statues of saints started appearing alongside roads.

People found comfort in the shrines, directing their prayers at them during war and outbreaks of disease, or in thanks.

A significant number of wayside shrines remain alongside roads throughout Slovakia, contributing to the unique atmosphere of the countryside.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Here's what the across-the-board coronavirus testing should look like

The Defence Ministry introduced the basic steps of the planned testing.

Bratislava is testing special trolleybus

Public transport should become greener in the capital.

Bratislava borroved the hybrid trolleybus from the Czech city of České Budějovice for a week.

Teachers trust conspiracy media, they think the government is not handling the pandemic well

One-third of teachers think the coronavirus vaccination is a preparation for implanting chips, recent poll shows.

The school in Trenčianske Stankovce.

Ombudswoman, summer festival and a scientist. The awards for sustainable development have been granted

The Pontis Foundation awarded organisations, institutions and individuals for the second time.