Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovak President says Ireland's rejection of Lisbon Treaty changes nothing

Ireland’s rejection of the Lisbon Treaty in a referendum on June 12 will change nothing as far as the functioning of the European Union (EU) is concerned, according to Slovakia’s head of state. The EU will continue working on the basis of those principles and programmes it already has, President Ivan Gašparovič said. Gašparovič thinks re-evaluation of the treaty by Ireland is possible. He accepts the outcome of the popular vote, in which the treaty was turned down by 53.4 to 46.6 percent.

Ireland’s rejection of the Lisbon Treaty in a referendum on June 12 will change nothing as far as the functioning of the European Union (EU) is concerned, according to Slovakia’s head of state. The EU will continue working on the basis of those principles and programmes it already has, President Ivan Gašparovič said. Gašparovič thinks re-evaluation of the treaty by Ireland is possible. He accepts the outcome of the popular vote, in which the treaty was turned down by 53.4 to 46.6 percent.

Nonetheless, he said it is not a good sign, and reflects an inability to negotiate and reach agreements within the 27-nation bloc. The president noted that a two-day summit of the European Council started on June 19 in Brussels, bringing together representatives of EU states and, according to him, it will come to a certain decision. He said he cannot imagine that Ireland will be promised exceptions in order to overturn its rejection since a single exception could change the whole system. None of the EU’s members was forced to join the bloc he said, adding that all of them wanted this step and had therefore pledged to meet certain conditions and rules valid in the European Union. In the wake of its rejection in Ireland, the Lisbon Treaty is unlikely to take effect, as planned, on January 1, 2009. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

How rock music helped bring down the totalitarian regime Video

A new film shows that Rock & Roll, forbidden in the Soviet Union, helped to end the Cold War.

Illustrative Stock Photo

Movies under an open sky feel differently than in an air-conditioned cinema Photo

The popularity of outdoor cinemas is increasing in Bratislava

Bažant Kinematograf on the Magio Pláž beach

Peter Sagan announces split with his wife Katarína

The Slovak cycling star who has a young son said “It will be much better this way”.

Peter Sagan marries Katarína, November 2015.

Top 3 news from Last Week in Slovakia Video

Slovakia to buy 14 American fighter jets.

This archive picture from 2014 shows an older model of the F-16 fighter jets.