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Croatia talks about state of Adriatic, EU accession

Slovak Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška met with his Croatian counterpart Luka Bebic on July 7. The topics of their talks included protection of the Adriatic Sea, construction of highways and Croatia’s accession to the EU and NATO. Croatia would like to see EU member states, including Slovakia, actively protect the Adriatic Sea, Bebic said.

Slovak Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška met with his Croatian counterpart Luka Bebic on July 7. The topics of their talks included protection of the Adriatic Sea, construction of highways and Croatia’s accession to the EU and NATO. Croatia would like to see EU member states, including Slovakia, actively protect the Adriatic Sea, Bebic said.

Some serious environmental issues concerning the sea are being downplayed, such as over-fishing and oil slicks, Bebic said. Paška expressed support for efforts to protect it. Both politicians also spoke about the construction of highways to connect the Baltic Sea with the Adriatic. Bebic said that Croatia would finish its stretch by the end of next year. He believes that there will be a highway built also in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Paška assured Bebic of Slovakia's support for Croatia's aspirations to become a member of the EU and NATO soon. Bebic said that Croatians would continue reforms to bring their laws into line with EU legislation. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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