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State could lose billions due to alleged error

Slovakia may have to pay billions of crowns if allegations that the Regulatory Office for Network Industries (ÚRSO) erred when setting prices for natural gas for households prove true.

Slovakia may have to pay billions of crowns if allegations that the Regulatory Office for Network Industries (ÚRSO) erred when setting prices for natural gas for households prove true.

A firm named Slov-Energia has already forwarded claims to the Justice Ministry based on contracts with 30,000 clients of gas utility SPP. Slov-Energia representative Marek Kainrath told journalists on July 17 that on average one contract represents potential damages ranging from Sk40,000 (€1,328) to Sk70,000 (€2,323), while interest on owed principal is growing daily.

Slov-Energia alleges that ÚRSO erred because it failed to publish its decision on the price of natural gas in the Collection of Laws of the Slovak Republic. According to calculations of the company, a household that buys 4,000 cubic metres of natural gas suffered annual damages of Sk66,888 (€2,220), and there are about 450,000 such households in the country. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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