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Jakubisko's Bathory earns over Sk8 million in one week

In its first week, Slovak director Juraj Jakubisko's new film 'Bathory' has became the most successful film in Slovak history in terms of recipients. The movie earned Sk8.37 million (€278,000) and was seen by 64,154 cinema-goers in its first week of screening, Zuzana Szaboova from Bontonfilm told news wire TASR.

In its first week, Slovak director Juraj Jakubisko's new film 'Bathory' has became the most successful film in Slovak history in terms of recipients. The movie earned Sk8.37 million (€278,000) and was seen by 64,154 cinema-goers in its first week of screening, Zuzana Szaboova from Bontonfilm told news wire TASR.

Bathory debuted to a packed audience at the 43rd Karlovy Vary International Film Festival on July 5.
According to legend, as well as several bestsellers, the 16th century Hungarian noblewoman became so obsessed with attaining eternal youth, she slaughtered more than 600 young girls to bathe in their blood. But in the film, Jakubisko looks behind the myths and suggests she was actually a victim of a smear campaign rooted in political and ethnic strife, according to an earlier Slovak Spectator report.

At a cost of almost Sk400 million, Bathory, which was co-produced by Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Hungary and the United Kingdom, is the most expensive film in Slovak and Czech filmmaking history.

For more details please see The Slovak Spectator report “Bathory tickets sold out in Karlovy Vary” published on July 14th.

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