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AROUND SLOVAKIA

Škoda cars are most popular for thieves

IN THE first half of 2008, 2,123 cars were stolen in Slovakia. The most common targets for thieves were the Škoda Octavia and Škoda Fabia models, police spokesman Viktor Plézel told the SITA newswire.

IN THE first half of 2008, 2,123 cars were stolen in Slovakia. The most common targets for thieves were the Škoda Octavia and Škoda Fabia models, police spokesman Viktor Plézel told the SITA newswire.


Foreigners have also experienced car thefts in Slovakia; the police recorded 653 thefts of vehicles with foreign licence plates, Plézel added.

Police managed to clear up 460 cases of all car thefts.

“These are the cases when the perpetrator was found. If we find the missing car but don’t discover who stole it, we register the case as unsolved,” Plézel explained.

The highest number of thefts were in Bratislava and its vicinity, the spokesman added.


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