HISTORY TALKS...

Aerial view unveils Nitra history

THIS POSTCARD shows the oldest part of Nitra as viewed from the air during the 1920s. This view clearly indicates some of the changes the city has undergone during the ensuing 80 years.

THIS POSTCARD shows the oldest part of Nitra as viewed from the air during the 1920s. This view clearly indicates some of the changes the city has undergone during the ensuing 80 years.

The dominant physical feature of Nitra, Zobor Hill, was not heavily populated in the 1920s.

Contrary to today, when family homes and estates dominate much of the hill, the sunny slopes of Zobor were covered mostly with vineyards during the first half of the 20th century.

What we see in the picture is the town of Párovce, which was incorporated into Nitra in 1886.

The dense construction visible in the left corner of the postcard is no longer standing.

Alas, this site became a victim of communist redevelopment in the 1960s when 13 mansions, five pubs, one synagogue, and two Jewish schools were demolished.

The only medieval building preserved was the Romanesque church of St Stephan from the 10th-11th century, which now stands surrounded by drab concrete apartment buildings.

Nitra, like other Slovak towns and villages, suffered a host of architectural desecrations under the communist regime but in spite of this, much of its magic remains preserved today.


Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: Slovakia still dealing with the loss of its talent

Economy minister promises extensive support for hydrogen technologies in Slovakia. Far-right supporters protested in front of PM’s house during the weekend.

The far-right ĽSNS organised a protest in front of PM Igor Matovič's house in Trnava.

Hospital manners expose the toxicity of Kollár

Unjustified privileges overshadow some good news of the coalition's work. Halloween testing will not be repeated during advent time.

PM Igor Matovič (l) and Speaker of Parliament Boris Kollár

Sulík’s party benefits from the dispute with PM Matovič

The Hlas party of former PM Pellegrini is rising, too.

Economy Minister Richard Sulík (l) was charged by PM Igor Matovič (r) to purchase millions of antigen tests.

Anyone can publish a book. Authors often avoid publishers

Self-publishing is setting a new trend.

Nikoleta Kováčová has published two cookbooks without the aid of a publishing house.