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Dogs gather at Incheba

THOUSANDS of dogs pranced about Incheba exhibition complex in Bratislava on August 16 and 17 during the Duo Danube Show.

THOUSANDS of dogs pranced about Incheba exhibition complex in Bratislava on August 16 and 17 during the Duo Danube Show.

Štefan Štefík, president of the Slovak Cynologic Association, told the TA3 news channel that 200 breeds were presented at the show, putting it among the biggest in Europe. Owners came from 19 countries, but mostly from the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The jury members were from 16 countries. The most exhibited breeds were the Rhodesian Ridgeback and the Golden Retriever.

The Wolf Dogs Club used the occasion to mark its 25th anniversary. This Slovak breed, which was cross-bred in Czechoslovakia from a wolf and German shepherd, has spread throughout the world. Its breeders came from Poland, Italy, the Czech Republic, Slovakia.

The show was one of the rehearsals for the World Dog Show, which will take place in Bratislava in October next year. Its organisers expect 30,000 dogs from around the world.


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