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Bus crash kills 14 Slovak tourists, critically injures two

A bus of Slovak tourists travelling to Croatia crashed on September 7, killing 14 and injuring 19. Two of the injured are in critical condition.

A bus of Slovak tourists travelling to Croatia crashed on September 7, killing 14 and injuring 19. Two of the injured are in critical condition.

The Foreign Affairs Ministry stated that the list of fatalities will be release once identification has been completed.

The bus, which left Košice in the evening on September 6, went off the road at around 6 a.m. the next morning. It crashed through roadside barriers before colliding with a concrete pillar of an overpass. The accident, which is now under investigation, is believed to have resulted from either the driver falling asleep or a burst tyre.

"It was a terrible sight. The injured were draped over each another. Some people were still trapped between the seats, which had fallen on top of them. We were unable to get to them for some time," one of the rescuers told Croatian television channel HRT.

The Slovak Cabinet has been coordinating help for the passengers. Prime Minister Robert Fico has agreed with Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák to dispatch aircraft to fly home some of the injured.

Fico, Parliamentary Chairman Pavol Paška, and President Ivan Gašparovič have all expressed their condolences to the bereaved families. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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