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Public gathering 'No to a Fascist Slovakia' to be held in Bratislava

A public gathering called 'Nie fašizácii Slovenska' (No to a Fascist Slovakia) will be held on September 11 at the National Monument Museum in Bratislava, the TASR newswire wrote.

A public gathering called 'Nie fašizácii Slovenska' (No to a Fascist Slovakia) will be held on September 11 at the National Monument Museum in Bratislava, the TASR newswire wrote.

The event coincides with commemorations of September 9, which was the date in 1941 on which the Jewish Code was adopted, which stripped Jews of their rights and allowed for their deportation. Miroslav Kocúr of the Nechceme sa prizerať (We’re not just spectators) civic association is organising the gathering.

The gathering will attract historians, civil activists, and personalities from public life, including Slovak actress Emília Vašáryová, historian of the Slovak Academy of Sciences Katarína Hradská, and musician Michal Kaščák. The signatories of the initiative include Peter Breiner (Slovak composer, conductor and pianist), actress Magda Vášáryová, clergyman Anton Srholec, actor Marián Geišberg, politicians Lucia Žitňanská, Monika Beňová, Peter Zajac, Frantisek Šebej, and others. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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