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Paška: September 9 a black day in Slovak history

Parliamentary Chairman Pavol Paška expressed his deep respect to all of the victims of fascist ideology on the eve of Holocaust Victims Remembrance Day - September 9.

Parliamentary Chairman Pavol Paška expressed his deep respect to all of the victims of fascist ideology on the eve of Holocaust Victims Remembrance Day - September 9.

According to Paška, September 9 is a black day in Slovak history. On September 9, 1941, the Jewish Code was adopted, which allowed for 70,000 Slovaks to be stripped of their civil rights and deported to concentration camps.

"During the Slovak National Uprising, the Slovak nation revolted against the fascist regime not only with words, but with actions, showing their clear aversion to racial and religious intolerance. In the spirit of the anti-fascist tradition, which has strong roots in Slovakia, we should act resolutely against any display of neo-Nazism today," said Paška.

These values are also expressed in a parliamentary resolution passed to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day.

"This declaration clearly demonstrates that we will never forget the monstrosities of fascism in World War II, and that we highly regard the values of solidarity and tolerance and we will continue to fight all forms of extremism," Paška said. "If September 9, 1941 was the black day in Slovak history, every other September 9 should be a day of reproach – a symbol of the fact that nobody is forgetting and nobody wants to forget the innocent victims of World War II." TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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