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Slovakia sends military plane to bring home crash victims from Croatia

On September 10, the Slovak Cabinet announced it was sending an air force transport airplane to Croatia to bring home the remains of fourteen Slovak tourists killed in a bus crash in Croatia on Sunday.

On September 10, the Slovak Cabinet announced it was sending an air force transport airplane to Croatia to bring home the remains of fourteen Slovak tourists killed in a bus crash in Croatia on Sunday.

Cabinet ministers made the decision based on a previous agreement with health insurance companies. Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák said that the plane will leave in a few days, or even hours. The bodies will be transported to Košice, where they will be DNA-tested, as only seven of the victims have so far been identified.

Three Slovaks remain in hospital in Zagreb and one woman remains hospitalised in Rijeka. In the morning of September 10, a fifth injured woman returned to Slovakia from a hospital in Gospic. As with four women who were taken back to Slovakia on the evening of September 9, she was hospitalised in Košice. Twenty-six people were already flown back to Slovakia on a government plane shortly after the accident.

Fourteen people were killed in the bus accident on Croatia's main highway, which connects the capital, Zagreb, with Split. The bus hit a highway flyover pillar near the town of Gospic. The police have been examining two possible causes of the accident: the driver falling asleep, or a burst tyre. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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