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OKS asks Prosecutor General for legal opinion on Slota's statements

Ondrej Dostál, vice-chairman of the non-parliamentary Civic Conservative Party (OKS), filed a request on October 7 to the General Prosecutor's Office to investigate whether Slovak National Party (SNS) chairman Ján Slota's recent statements about Hungarians meet the standard needed to charge him with defamation of a nation, race or conviction.

Ondrej Dostál, vice-chairman of the non-parliamentary Civic Conservative Party (OKS), filed a request on October 7 to the General Prosecutor's Office to investigate whether Slovak National Party (SNS) chairman Ján Slota's recent statements about Hungarians meet the standard needed to charge him with defamation of a nation, race or conviction.

According to Dostál, Slota committed the crime by describing Hungarians' ancestors as “bandits and murderers” and the Hungarian state symbol - the Turul (a type of falcon) - as a “nasty parrot.”

"If prosecutors come to the conclusion that Slota didn't commit such a crime, MPs should reconsider whether to delete that paragraph from the Penal Code," Dostál told the state-run TASR newswire. "Taking a stance on his behaviour doesn't serve to divide people into Slovaks and Hungarians, but rather to decent people and those willing to tolerate arrogant crudeness and the dissemination of national discord."

The ethnic-Hungarian SMK party said on October 7 that it had also decided to press charges against Slota for unspecified statements. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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