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Survey: German companies in Slovakia lack workforce

German companies in Slovakia lack a qualified workforce, according to a survey carried out this summer in 51 German-owned companies. The survey, which was conducted by the Slovak-German Trade and Industry Chamber in co-operation with Kienbaum Consultants, also revealed that salaries in the companies had increased by 9 percent year-to-year, while the German investors plan further increases. Dietrich Max Fey from energy-distribution company Západoslovenská energetika (ZSE) said that employees are already asking for higher salaries in connection with the introduction of the euro. He said that this is dangerous because companies may move further east in search of lower costs. As for the lack of professionals, Fey said that the situation is especially tense in Bratislava, where there aren't enough controllers and engineers.

German companies in Slovakia lack a qualified workforce, according to a survey carried out this summer in 51 German-owned companies. The survey, which was conducted by the Slovak-German Trade and Industry Chamber in co-operation with Kienbaum Consultants, also revealed that salaries in the companies had increased by 9 percent year-to-year, while the German investors plan further increases.

Dietrich Max Fey from energy-distribution company Západoslovenská energetika (ZSE) said that employees are already asking for higher salaries in connection with the introduction of the euro. He said that this is dangerous because companies may move further east in search of lower costs. As for the lack of professionals, Fey said that the situation is especially tense in Bratislava, where there aren't enough controllers and engineers.

In addition, 65 percent of the companies taking part in the survey said that they expect further increases in demand for qualified personnel in Slovakia. Another problem revealed by the study is that university graduates have insufficient practical experience, said Fey. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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