AROUND SLOVAKIA

Archaeologists discover rotunda

AN EXCAVATION near the St Nicolaus Dome in Trnava has uncovered the foundations of the town’s oldest sacred building.

The Trnava excavation uncovered ancient architecture.The Trnava excavation uncovered ancient architecture. (Source: SITA)

AN EXCAVATION near the St Nicolaus Dome in Trnava has uncovered the foundations of the town’s oldest sacred building.

A monumental stone rotunda with a 7.6-metre radius was found six metres below the eastern side of the dome. According to archaeologists, this is not the St George Rotunda, as was originally thought, but probably the rotunda of St Michael's Church, the SITA newswire wrote.

“The proximity of the St Michael Church, which was supposed to have been built after the rotunda had been destroyed, confirms this hypothesis,” said Erik Hrnčiarik, from the School of Classical Archaeology at Trnava University, who headed the excavation.

The archaeologists had originally sought to uncover the Romanesque St. George’s Rotunda, which was mentioned in documents dating back to the 18th century.

“It was probably something made up by a historian,” Hrnčiarik said.

Following the documents, archaeologists originally searched for the rotunda on the other side of the church, where a former sacristy had been. The rotunda, which is one of 19 in Slovakia, was lost in 1360, but the date of its foundation has not been fully agreed upon.

“We suppose the building was created at the same time as the St Nicolaus Dome in the 11th century, but according to other findings, it is possible that it was built during the period of the Great Moravian Empire,” Hrnčiarik said.

The research uncovered other interesting findings.

“We discovered 166 graves with skeletons and parts of three foundation brickworks in architecture so far unknown,” Hrnčiarik said.

The graves, which date from the town’s beginnings to the 18th century, when Emperor Joseph II forbade burials near churches, held various items, especially fabrics.


Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Here's what the across-the-board coronavirus testing should look like

The Defence Ministry introduced the basic steps of the planned testing.

Bratislava is testing special trolleybus

Public transport should become greener in the capital.

Bratislava borroved the hybrid trolleybus from the Czech city of České Budějovice for a week.

Teachers trust conspiracy media, they think the government is not handling the pandemic well

One-third of teachers think the coronavirus vaccination is a preparation for implanting chips, recent poll shows.

The school in Trenčianske Stankovce.

Ombudswoman, summer festival and a scientist. The awards for sustainable development have been granted

The Pontis Foundation awarded organisations, institutions and individuals for the second time.