Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Cabinet approves Bill dissolving military courts

Military courts in Slovakia will cease to exist as of March, when twenty military judges will start working for the general courts.

Military courts in Slovakia will cease to exist as of March, when twenty military judges will start working for the general courts.

The cabinet has approved a draft amendment to the law on courts to this effect.

Justice Minister Štefan Harabin said he considers military courts to be superfluous. His ministry pointed out that military courts have a much lighter workload than general courts. The reason for this is the fact that their jurisdiction has been significantly curtailed by the present government, leading to a reduction in the number of cases they hear.

The Cabinet proposed the amendment in August, despite protests from Defence Minister Jaroslav Baška and Prosecutor General Dobroslav Trnka. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

They reported corruption at the Foreign Ministry. Now they receive an award

The tenth year of the White Crow award, celebrating young people and activists who break prejudices and go against the tide.

White Crow award laureates

Blog: Slovakia’s time to shine is now

People may be able to recognise Slovakia’s neighbouring countries through associations with food, drinks, beautiful cities or well-known political events. But Slovakia remains very much "hidden".

Bratislava Castle

The day that changed the Tatra mountains for good Photo

The windstorm damaged 12,000 hectares of woods on November 19, 2004.

Tatras after the 2004 calamity

Smer follows a downward trend but may escape oblivion

What does the defeat in regional elections mean for the future of Slovakia’s strongest party?

“How could it be a fiasco when a political party wins most councillors among all parties?” asks PM Robert Fico.