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Slovakia lags behind Europe in informatisation

SLOVAKIA is making progress in the informatisation of society but lags behind other EU member states by approximately five years, said the government’s plenipotentiary for information society, Pavol Tarina, at the IT Summit 2008 conference on September 18.

SLOVAKIA is making progress in the informatisation of society but lags behind other EU member states by approximately five years, said the government’s plenipotentiary for information society, Pavol Tarina, at the IT Summit 2008 conference on September 18.

He said that Slovakia occupied an unflattering penultimate spot on the chart of informatisation among EU countries one year ago, the SITA newswire wrote. According to him, Slovakia is now making faster progress than other EU countries. He expects that in around two years Slovakia could reach the EU average, if the current pace of change is maintained.

Tarina added, however, that the informatisation chart of EU member states is relative. “If all of Europe were to do nothing, and Slovakia were to do its best, it could be one of the top three countries. However, the fact is that neighbouring countries are not sleeping, either,” said Tarina.
He pointed out that Slovakia does not currently achieve the EU average for informatisation of public administration. The ambition of Slovakia should be to ensure that 90 percent of communication between citizens and public administration bodies is electronic. However, if the average numbers of IT-aware people and computers are taken into consideration, Slovakia does not perform much better or worse.

Topic: IT


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